Article Abstract

Synchronous multiple lung cancers presenting as multifocal pure ground glass nodules: are whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography and brain enhanced magnetic resonance imaging necessary?

Authors: Meng Li, Yuan Wan, Li Zhang, Li-Na Zhou, Zhuo Shi, Rui Zhang, Yan-Lei Hou, Ning Wu

Abstract

Background: Multifocal ground glass nodules (GGNs) represent a special radiological pattern indicative of synchronous multiple lung cancers (SMLCs), especially adenocarcinoma. However, the necessity of performing whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) scanning and brain enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a staging workup for multifocal pure GGN (pGGN) patients remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of these two imaging scans for patients with multifocal pGGNs.
Methods: This retrospective study was reviewed and approved by the ethics committee of the Cancer Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. The study cohort was retrospectively selected from patients with multifocal pGGNs who underwent whole-body PET-CT examinations and/or brain enhanced MRIs between January 2010 and February 2019 at our institution. The additional value of the two exams for detecting nodal and distant metastases was evaluated.
Results: In total, 73 patients (male-to-female ratio, 20:53; median age, 57 years) with multifocal pGGNs who underwent whole-body PET-CT (55 patients) and/or brain enhanced MRI (25 patients) were enrolled. No clearly metastatic lesions were detected. Among the enrolled patients, 53 (128 pGGNs) underwent complete surgical resection. All pGGNs were adenocarcinomas and/or preneoplasias, and no lymph node metastases were found on final pathology. Whole-body PET-CT and brain enhanced MRI added no definite benefit compared with chest CT alone before surgery.
Conclusions: Whole-body PET-CT scans and brain enhanced MRIs are not necessary for patients with multifocal pGGNs.